Thursday 17 August 2017

Polygamy, marriage and the law of unintended consequences

A marriage that is 'potentially' polygamous is capable of being recognised under Irish law, writes Bruce Arnold

Is family just the plaything of the judges? The court ruling has rocked the institution of the family to its foundations
Is family just the plaything of the judges? The court ruling has rocked the institution of the family to its foundations

Bruce Arnold

Not much more than two ears ago, during the so-called Marriage Equality Referendum, I took issue with those who sought to introduce, into our Constitution, same-sex marriage. I disapproved strongly of the proposal and used as my starting point my own marriage, which I was content to write about.

Marriage had brought happiness to me and those close to me, and through example, I endeavoured to bring that happiness to others. The married state is, for those who enter it, unique and precious. For those lucky enough to have children, it represents the 'nature' of life, and this indefinable quality bestows on marriage its unique character.

I consider myself tolerant and liberal. I have no objection to people opting for an alternative lifestyle, whether it is a homosexual relationship or living in a hippy commune. I do, however, object to the insertion in the Constitution of the proposition that such unions are the bedrock on which the family is founded and our society established.

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