Wednesday 7 December 2016

'One size fits all' approach to RE studies is no substitute for diversity of patronage

Eamonn Conway

Published 09/12/2015 | 02:30

'On the basis of how the NCCA wants the course taught, Christian parents have good reason to feel that their children should not be exposed to a methodology that is at best going to be agnostic about their faith. They might want exemptions too'
'On the basis of how the NCCA wants the course taught, Christian parents have good reason to feel that their children should not be exposed to a methodology that is at best going to be agnostic about their faith. They might want exemptions too'

It is difficult to know what the problem is that the proposed primary curriculum subject 'Education about Religions and Beliefs (ERB), and Ethics' is meant to solve.

  • Go To

Is it about inclusion? If so, it seems it's not going to work.

The recent case in Castletroy College, Limerick is salutary in this regard. Parents took their child out of a post-primary first year religion programme similar to the new course the National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NCCA) wants to introduce to primary schools. The course wasn't faith formation, but the parents still wanted an exemption, and were entitled to it.

Please sign in or register with Independent.ie for free access to Opinions.

Sign In

Read More

Don't Miss

Editor's Choice