Thursday 21 September 2017

Niamh Gallagher: Making the legacy of the women of 1916 come alive for all - not just the historians

Actresses Sarah Greene, Ruth Bradley and Charlie Murphy pictured before a press screening at the Lighthouse Cinema in Smithfield for the launch of RTE’s 1916 drama ‘Rebellion’. Photo: Steve Humphreys
Actresses Sarah Greene, Ruth Bradley and Charlie Murphy pictured before a press screening at the Lighthouse Cinema in Smithfield for the launch of RTE’s 1916 drama ‘Rebellion’. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Niamh Gallagher

A cynic in my life called me the morning after the first episode of 'Rebellion' was shown. "Well," he said, "that was something else. You'd be forgiven for thinking there were no men involved in the Rising at all. It's PC gone mad."

I like these people in my life, they keep my feet on the ground when I'm getting carried away on my feminist wings and remind me that, unfortunately, not everyone sees the world through the same lens as I do. My cynical pal had not appreciated the artistic decision to tell the story through these female characters (while still capturing the roles of the leading players), but rather viewed it as yet another veiled attempt by women to take over the world.

I love 'Rebellion' because it has us all talking. Love it or hate it, everyone's watching it and we all have a view. That's exactly how I hoped this year would be: looking back, learning, analysing, arguing and - together - engaging with our past and looking to the future.

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