Tuesday 25 July 2017

Macron may now lack clout to stop 'the street' from blocking his attempts to bulldoze through reforms

French President Emmanuel Macron after voting in the second round of parliamentary elections in Le Touquet, France, on Sunday. Photo: Reuters
French President Emmanuel Macron after voting in the second round of parliamentary elections in Le Touquet, France, on Sunday. Photo: Reuters

Henry Samuel

France has woken up to a parliament dominated by the centrist party of Emmanuel Macron, yet a curious ambiance reigns.

In theory, the newly elected president now has all the levers of power at his disposal and yet there remains a nagging question: does he have the democratic clout to drive through reforms after an election in which 57pc of the electorate chose not to cast a ballot?

It was supposed to be a landslide the likes of which haven't been seen since Charles de Gaulle. In the end, his La République en Marche! (Republic on the Move!) party took 308 out of the 577 seats up for grabs in the National Assembly - and 350 counting its centrist Modem allies.

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