Tuesday 6 December 2016

In times of stress, Turkey and the West only come closer together

All of Turkey's partners have an interest in continuity, writes Shashank Joshi

Shashank Joshi

Published 17/07/2016 | 02:30

Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan delivers a speech to his supporters in Istanbul. REUTERS/Murad Sezer
Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan delivers a speech to his supporters in Istanbul. REUTERS/Murad Sezer

Turkey stands at the crossroads of Europe and Asia. As such, it has been a central player in Western strategy over the past several years.

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It is Nato's largest continental army in an age of Russian revanchism; a powerful force in the Syrian civil war; and at the crux of Europe's migrant crisis. It is therefore likely that, had last Friday's plotters succeeded in ousting Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Western countries would have come to terms with the new regime, much as they did with Pakistan's junta after 1999 and Egypt's after 2013.

Nato's history, after all, is littered with dictatorships. But it is evident that Erdogan has survived.

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