Friday 22 September 2017

How Trump ended a jaded political ideology

Rivals Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton shake hands before one of their political debates in the run up to the US presidential election Photo: AP Photo/David Goldman
Rivals Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton shake hands before one of their political debates in the run up to the US presidential election Photo: AP Photo/David Goldman

Ray Kinsella

The US presidential election delivered a tectonic shock to the US political system. Its impact across the global political economy has been equally dramatic. In Europe, no less than the US, all bets are off. The elite of the established order has been quick to denounce Donald Trump's victory as an expression of 'populism'. Well, they would, wouldn't they? They are wrong.

The US presidential election delivered a tectonic shock to the US political system. Its impact across the global political economy has been equally dramatic. In Europe, no less than the US, all bets are off. The elite of the established order has been quick to denounce Donald Trump's victory as an expression of 'populism'. Well, they would, wouldn't they? They are wrong.

It's early days - but supporters of Hillary Clinton and her neo-liberal ideology are now confronting the awful reality that the US (and therefore the world) economy has not tanked. On the contrary, markets are buoyant and expectations high. President-elect Trump has talked to Russian President Vladimir Putin and the prospects for the defeat of Isil, peace in Syria and the demilitarisation of Europe are improved. Suddenly, the rhetoric of war and of "Russian aggression" looks jaded and to be serving only the interests of War Inc. Mr Trump is succeeding in changing the trajectory of history. Even the pop glitterati are not emigrating.

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