Thursday 24 August 2017

Gender identity can be a matter of life and death

If you want to make jokes at the expense of others, it's more important to be funny than to be inoffensive

JONATHAN CLYNCH: Not disclosing his ‘gender fluid’ identity meant hiding his real self from friends, colleagues and the public, lest they think him weird.
JONATHAN CLYNCH: Not disclosing his ‘gender fluid’ identity meant hiding his real self from friends, colleagues and the public, lest they think him weird.
Willie Kealy

Willie Kealy

Let's talk about sex. It's the most talked-about subject anyway. And it's also the subject about which most jokes are made.

So when the RTE broadcaster Jonathan Clynch came out last week and announced he was 'gender fluid' and would henceforth be known as Jonathan Rachel Clynch, it led to some hilarity. (He didn't plan to come out the way he did - on the front page of the Star newspaper - but he did intend to do it on Marion Finucane's radio programme the same day, so same difference).

There is only one rule where humour is concerned and no, it is not to avoid giving offence. In fact, giving offence is often a good thing. Some people need to be offended and there are those who will travel far to be offended. But most people will laugh at a good joke, even if it is at their own expense.

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