Monday 24 April 2017

Eilis O'Hanlon: Victims pay when dice loaded in favour of criminals

The real problem isn't that some offenders are returned to prison, but that they were let out at all, writes Eilis O'Hanlon

HIGH COURT: Judge Moriarty struck down certain subsections of the Criminal Justice Act. Photo: Tom Burke
HIGH COURT: Judge Moriarty struck down certain subsections of the Criminal Justice Act. Photo: Tom Burke

Eilis O'Hanlon

Duhaime's Legal Dictionary defines a suspended sentence as "a judicial prerogative retained by a sentencing judge on a person convicted of a crime by which the full sentencing of a convicted person is suspended or deferred until some future time commensurate with the convicted person's compliance with the terms of an interim probation order".

Sounds sensible enough.

In fact, some might say it's a fair and enlightened way to deal with those who've committed serious crimes. They get a reduction in their sentences as long as they agree to keep their noses clean for the remainder of the unserved time behind bars. If they don't, then they can be rearrested and ordered back to jail to complete the full term.

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