Thursday 21 September 2017

Dying art of Christmas cards is anathema to younger generations raised on social media

'A recent survey found that the sending of Christmas cards is still fairly popular among older generations, but that the tradition is lost among those under 35, who say they could not be bothered to send a Christmas card to family or friends'. Stock photo: Getty
'A recent survey found that the sending of Christmas cards is still fairly popular among older generations, but that the tradition is lost among those under 35, who say they could not be bothered to send a Christmas card to family or friends'. Stock photo: Getty

Lorraine Courtney

The number of Christmas cards seems to fall every year, letterbox by letterbox, jolly snowman by red-nose reindeer. There's something quite sad about it. What will it mean if no one sends Christmas cards or letters in the future?

Since their invention more than 170 years ago, Christmas cards have become as much a part of festive tradition as stockings and cranberry sauce. But the tradition may be in danger of dying out, with new research suggesting that the writing of festive cards is becoming somewhat of a dying art in recent years, with most of us deciding to send emoji texts instead. We aren't getting the usual numbers of cards, at least not the old-fashioned paper kind.

A recent survey found that the sending of Christmas cards is still fairly popular among older generations, but that the tradition is lost among those under 35, who say they could not be bothered to send a Christmas card to family or friends.

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