Friday 22 September 2017

Death of a Dublin jihadi confirms worst fears of the enemy within

Khalid Kelly was suspected of radicalising Muslim converts before he blew himself up in Mosul earlier this month

After years of spouting fanatical extremism, defending terrorist attacks on the West, calling for Barack Obama's death, radicalising on social media and preaching from a soapbox outside the GPO, Kelly had turned from propagandist to activist.
After years of spouting fanatical extremism, defending terrorist attacks on the West, calling for Barack Obama's death, radicalising on social media and preaching from a soapbox outside the GPO, Kelly had turned from propagandist to activist.
Maeve Sheehan

Maeve Sheehan

Khalid Kelly spent his last months in Ireland staying in a private apartment rented by the Islamic State's suspected "fixer". The apartment was in a north Dublin suburb that was a throwback to the Celtic Tiger days, built close to the airport with restaurants, pubs, shops, a creche and a gym. In Kelly's fanatical world, it was a place filled with "infidels" and "kafir". His neighbours could never have guessed that the Irish man who dressed in Arabic clothes was a jihadi in their midst, or that his portly Jordanian flatmate was his mentor.

By then, Kelly - a Christian Brothers-educated former altar boy from Dublin's Liberties who converted to Islam after a spell in a Saudi jail - was on the final stretch of his journey towards fighting for Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isil).

After years of spouting fanatical extremism, defending terrorist attacks on the West, calling for Barack Obama's death, radicalising on social media and preaching from a soapbox outside the GPO, Kelly had turned from propagandist to activist.

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