Friday 28 April 2017

Chaos in the White House is great ammunition for opponents of Trump's reheated travel ban

US President Donald Trump is interviewed by a journalist in the Oval Office of the White House, Washington DC, this week. Photo: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters
US President Donald Trump is interviewed by a journalist in the Oval Office of the White House, Washington DC, this week. Photo: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

Jennifer Rubin

Opponents of US President Donald Trump's travel ban have one big advantage - the Trump White House. If not for the confusion - lack of staffing (nary a deputy, let alone an undersecretary or assistant secretary, has been named in national security-related departments), organisational disarray, policy differences or all of the above - the administration might have put together on its first try a legally enforceable executive order.

It might by now even have come up with a new executive order, thanks to a road map provided by the 9th Circuit. However, the rollout has been pushed back to next week.

Understand that if this is such a matter of urgent concern, the president would have had his advisers working around the clock on this (not transgender bathroom assignments, plans to deport non-criminal illegal immigrants or haggling with Mexican officials over a wall that Trump insists they pay for). In fact, since the point of the ban is to initiate a review of America's vetting procedures, you'd think that the Homeland Security Department would already have come up with its proposed "extreme vetting" recommendations.

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