Monday 24 July 2017

Brexit would force EU elite to address its deficiencies

Britain’s Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne (left) and former Chancellor Alistair Darling attend a pro-Remain event together at the Hitachi Rail Europe plant in Ashford, Kent – but the idea that the UK can reform the EU ‘from within’ is nonsense. Getty Images
Britain’s Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne (left) and former Chancellor Alistair Darling attend a pro-Remain event together at the Hitachi Rail Europe plant in Ashford, Kent – but the idea that the UK can reform the EU ‘from within’ is nonsense. Getty Images

Ray Kinsella

The main argument for Brexit has little to do with the UK itself. It has everything to do with the fact that the EU is stagnant. For the UK to 'Remain' would be to anchor it to a failed 'Union', that is anything but united and with absolutely no prospect for reform. To exit would be to reboot the UK economy, now constantly looking over its shoulder to Brussels and to the Franco-German axis which dominates decision-making in the EU.

Germany and France can afford to ignore the concerns of smaller countries - and have done so. The prospect of Brexit is different. It has laid bare the contradictions, anomalies and inequalities that now define 'Europe'. Brexit is the single event capable of forcing the EU elite to address the need for a more democratic and accountable - a less unequal and a more sustainable - European Partnership.

That is why there is an increasingly hysterical note to the protestations from the 'Remain' campaign and those pleading their case. They need to get a grip. Last year, the German Chancellor Dr Schäuble attempted to precipitate a Greek exit from the Eurozone. It was quite blatant - and against all protocols for European decision-making. Now Dr Schäuble pleads the case for Britain to remain in Europe. That is one measure of what Europe has become.

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