Sunday 20 August 2017

A proclamation for our people and their needs

The ideals of the 1916 leaders remain relevant today, so let's make the idea of equality a reality

'The Proclamation was still a work in progress when death put an end to all discussion and gave a certain sanctity to the document that was read out on the day' Photo: Julien Behal
'The Proclamation was still a work in progress when death put an end to all discussion and gave a certain sanctity to the document that was read out on the day' Photo: Julien Behal

Anthony Cronin

One hundred years ago tomorrow, Ireland successfully asserted its claim to nationhood. With the convening of the new Dail, it will bend itself again to the tasks of nationhood and the mutual obligations and demands which citizenship of any nation involves.

The Proclamation of 1916 was written mostly by James Connolly who, after the socialist fashion of the day, was much concerned with stating in it the importance of canals and waterways as part of the means of production, distribution and exchange. After such revision, the Proclamation was still a work in progress when death put an end to all discussion and gave a certain sanctity to the document that was read out on the day. As it stands, the Proclamation has no constitutional or canonical status. To everyone his or her own proclamation. Here, with due deference, are a few of the nuts and bolts of mine.

As a substitute for equality, our politicians speak much about equality of opportunity. Garret FitzGerald was particularly fond of doing so.

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