Friday 24 March 2017

Why a prayer for Paris could offend terror victims

People light candles and pray outside Le Carillon restaurant, one of the sites where 130 people were killed in Paris
People light candles and pray outside Le Carillon restaurant, one of the sites where 130 people were killed in Paris

Clodagh Finn

It is hard to understand how the global outpouring of solidarity symbolised by the hashtag #prayforparis might cause offence to some Parisians, yet it does.

The support and the empathy is deeply appreciated, though not always the prayers.

France is vehemently secular. Under the 1905 law that separates church and state, all symbols of religious belief - head scarves, bibles, crosses - are banned from public life. Confining religion to the private domain is a fundamental tenet of a country founded on the principles of liberté, egalité, fraternité.

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