Thursday 8 December 2016

Vincent Hogan: Rebel footballers must bury losing mentality to emerge from hurling’s long shadow

Published 15/09/2010 | 05:00

Cork footballer Graham Canty (left) and hurler Donal Og Cusack leave a players meeting in 2008 - Canty and his colleagues have never
commanded the popularity of the Rebel hurlers.
Cork footballer Graham Canty (left) and hurler Donal Og Cusack leave a players meeting in 2008 - Canty and his colleagues have never commanded the popularity of the Rebel hurlers.

To understand the place Cork footballers hold in the broad affections of their people, maybe the 2002 strike offers a revealing starting point.

  • Go To

For they were tugged, essentially, kicking and screaming to the picket-line, their appetite for conflict compromised by a terrible slaughter endured in that year's All-Ireland semi-final against Kerry. If the hurlers did not blink an eye about going to war with their own County Board, the footballers all but needed counselling.

Curiously, they had embraced the Gaelic Players' Association from the beginning, but not in anything but the most abstract, superficial way. It was a modest sub that they were content to pay in return for a T-shirt and the receipt of regular newsletters.

Please sign in or register with Independent.ie for free access to Opinions.

Sign In

Read More

Don't Miss

Editor's Choice