Thursday 19 October 2017

Sarah Carey: Invisible Woman - how motherhood removed my fingerprints

Donald Trump's Muslim ban reminded Sarah Carey of her difficulties entering the US. Motherhood had literally obliterated her identity

Demonstrators shout slogans during anti-Donald Trump immigration ban protests inside Terminal 4 at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Kate Munsch
Demonstrators shout slogans during anti-Donald Trump immigration ban protests inside Terminal 4 at San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, California, U.S., January 28, 2017. REUTERS/Kate Munsch
Sarah Carey

Sarah Carey

The row over Donald Trump's Muslim ban reminded me of my own difficulties entering the US. I always get through, because presumably international terrorists don't look like pale-skinned Irish pixies. Still, it's never easy.

You see, when I had my first baby, there was so much going on that I just ignored my sore fingertips. There were other parts of my body in fairly raw condition that needed mending; not to mention severe night sweats, which my mother speculated were caused by anxiety. As usual, she was close to the truth.

I waited, presuming body and soul would heal in time. But my poor fingers just got worse. They peeled and bled and it was really quite painful. They looked, and felt, like they'd been dipped in acid. One day, I realised they stung most when I was folding some clothes. Then the penny dropped. Maybe I had developed an allergy to washing powder?

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