Monday 24 April 2017

Mothers-to-be must believe in miracles - a natural childbirth

Women and doctors tend to get defensive when it comes to caesarean sections. Sarah Carey argues the costs of rising rates demand a solution

'No one is judging any single individual who, either by choice or circumstance, has delivered by caesarean section. But we must examine those circumstances and deconstruct the concept of choice. For all circumstances have causes, and all choices are framed within particular contexts'. Photo: PA
'No one is judging any single individual who, either by choice or circumstance, has delivered by caesarean section. But we must examine those circumstances and deconstruct the concept of choice. For all circumstances have causes, and all choices are framed within particular contexts'. Photo: PA
Sarah Carey

Sarah Carey

One broaches the subject of caesarean sections gingerly, knowing this thorny subject will raise hackles among women who can extract a sense of inadequacy from any of their life's accomplishments. Doctors get a tad shrill, too, when challenged on the subject. But as our national section rate breaches 30pc, it behoves any commentator on matters of public health to cease hiding behind the "no judgment!" defence.

No one is judging any single individual who, either by choice or circumstance, has delivered by caesarean section. But we must examine those circumstances and deconstruct the concept of choice. For all circumstances have causes, and all choices are framed within particular contexts.

Last Tuesday, I listened a doctor from St Luke's Hospital in Kilkenny, being interviewed by Pat Kenny on Newstalk about c-sections. The doctor deflected Kenny's query about medical practice in small hospitals, failing to volunteer the fact that last November, 61.9pc of first-time mothers in his own hospital had caesarean sections. There is no possible way each of those mothers was incapable of delivering naturally, and the end of the matter can't be a cheerful explainer on the radio.

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