Monday 29 May 2017

Midlands wind-farm bubble is foolishly ignored by officialdom

Thanks to the Greens, we are facing a glut of landscape-blighting windfarms that may soon be unviable, writes Sarah Carey

Thanks to the Greens, we are facing a glut of landscape-blighting windfarms that may soon be unviable
Thanks to the Greens, we are facing a glut of landscape-blighting windfarms that may soon be unviable
Sarah Carey

Sarah Carey

I thought I had forgiven the Greens. It's hard to stay mad at those guys. They're so wholesome, earnest, noble, decent. But anyone could have told them putting Fianna Fail back into power was a bad idea. I definitely did.

However, they paid a price. I've other grudges to hold. And I'm ready to move on. Then I discovered that the Greens left us a peculiar legacy, which has only just come to my attention. In Sarah-Land, the penny droppeth slowly like the gentle rain from heaven. Or the gentle breeze, to be more precise.

It's to do with wind energy, which is a bit like the Greens: wholesome and good, in theory. Former Green Party Minister for Energy Eamon Ryan committed Ireland to producing 40pc of its electricity from renewable sources by 2020. That's not a binding target, thank the Lord, but it is national strategy and it contributes to other EU climate change targets that are binding. Right now about 20pc of electricity comes from renewables, but "renewables" in Ireland equals wind. So by 2020 we're supposed to double the amount of electricity being generated from wind farms - and that means doubling the number of wind turbines.

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