Tuesday 6 December 2016

Rumours of the death of post-Brexit Britain have been greatly exaggerated

British politics has become an enthralling blood sport since the Brexit vote, but it's a scary feeling when no one seems to be in charge, writes Eilis O'Hanlon

Eilis O'Hanlon

Published 03/07/2016 | 02:30

EXTENDING HOPE: Enda Kenny, who travelled to the UK to canvass for a Remain vote in the Brexit referendum, shakes hands with UK Prime Minister David Cameron at 10 Downing Street in London. Photo: Chris Radburn
EXTENDING HOPE: Enda Kenny, who travelled to the UK to canvass for a Remain vote in the Brexit referendum, shakes hands with UK Prime Minister David Cameron at 10 Downing Street in London. Photo: Chris Radburn

Barely four months have passed since the Irish general election. The result of that was regarded at the time as the last word in chaos, with no obvious government in waiting and a desperate scramble to understand what the Irish people had said.

  • Go To

In retrospect, it now looks like a model of stability, compared with the mess which has hit British politics since the vote to leave the European Union. The Tory and Labour parties are in turmoil, with everyone knifing everyone else in the back; bitterness and recrimination reign supreme as so-called 'buyers' remorse' allegedly takes hold among those who voted out.

Remain voters think that they have been shafted; Leave voters believe they're being ignored. Both views have nuggets of truth.

Please sign in or register with Independent.ie for free access to Opinions.

Sign In

Read More

Don't Miss

Editor's Choice