Wednesday 20 September 2017

Mary Kenny: Jagger was never a radical – rock 'n' roll is a business that runs on capitalist lines

By all accounts Mick Jagger is an amiable grandfather, with a personal fortune of around €240m to pass on.
By all accounts Mick Jagger is an amiable grandfather, with a personal fortune of around €240m to pass on.
Mary Kenny

Mary Kenny

As I love stories about people having babies, I rejoice at the news that Sir Mick Jagger is to become a great-grandfather in the new year, when his grand-daughter Assisi will give birth. Assisi, aged 21, is the daughter of Jade Jagger, whose mother is Mick's first wife, Bianca.

Being the patriarch of a large brood (seven children by four mothers, four grandchildren) will suit the iconic Rolling Stone perfectly, as it reflects a truth which has gradually emerged about the redoubtable Jagger over the years: he ain't no anti-establishment figure. He's a conservative whose preferred daily reading is the 'Financial Times'.

Until 2002, when he was awarded a knighthood, conferred by Charles, Prince of Wales, some of Mick's fans still thought that he, and the Rolling Stones, were some kind of radical revolutionaries, because of all that fabulously startling music which upset old duffers back in the 1960s and 70s. Oh yes, the Stones surely were pioneers of rock 'n' roll, via rhythm and blues, and brought an unparalleled vitality to their performances.

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