Friday 28 July 2017

A national unity government can help us navigate uncharted waters

Taoiseach Enda Kenny spoke in slow motion; his face ashen beneath the make-up. Behind the scenes, officials scattered to compose briefing papers for ministers soon to be pressed for intelligent answers Photo: Tom Burke
Taoiseach Enda Kenny spoke in slow motion; his face ashen beneath the make-up. Behind the scenes, officials scattered to compose briefing papers for ministers soon to be pressed for intelligent answers Photo: Tom Burke
Liz O'Donnell

Liz O'Donnell

I have lost count of the umpteen media references to divorce since last Friday. Brexit has correctly been likened to a messy divorce, with all the related trauma for the parties concerned.

As with divorce, both sides are confused about the future, worried about money, security and potential isolation down the road. Irreconcilable differences remain between the parties.

But as the dust settles and some of the doom-laden predictions materialise, there is even a temptation to return to the familiarity of the status quo. Divorcing couples can be so overwhelmed by the magnitude of change that they consider a reversal of the break-up. Newly divorced couples can feel violated, abandoned, anxious and short-changed.

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