Thursday 8 December 2016

Why battle of Clontarf was a cake walk compared to commemorating the Rising

Published 21/04/2014 | 02:30

Over 500 vikings took over St Anne’s Park in Raheny today for the first day of the Battle of Clontarf Festival, hosted by Dublin City Council
Over 500 vikings took over St Anne’s Park in Raheny today for the first day of the Battle of Clontarf Festival, hosted by Dublin City Council
Commemoration illustration
STANDALONE Photo. Thousands gather to commemorate the 98th anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising at the GPO in Dublin. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday April 20, 2014. Photo credit should read: Niall Carson/PA Wire
STANDALONE Photo. President Michael D. Higgins inspects a guard of honour during the commemoration to mark the 98th anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising at the GPO in Dublin. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Sunday April 20, 2014. Photo credit should read: Niall Carson/PA Wire

GIVEN all the events of recent weeks, an apology to the Queen for the brutal way we treated her forces may be appropriate and timely.

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No. Settle down. I'm not talking about Elizabeth II, of the adjacent island. I'm thinking of Margrethe II of Denmark and all that ferocious carry-on in Clontarf a thousand years ago last Friday.

Commemorating '1014 And All That' was relatively easy. Lots of jolly costumed Vikings and mad Gaels prancing about re-enacting battles. And, those heathen unbelievers questioning whether saintly Brian Boru was at his prayers when Brodir surprised and murdered him after the battle, were among the few points of controversy.

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