Monday 29 May 2017

The horsey set, Dublin 'meeja' and old-fashioned begrudgery

'Be all Pollyanna and consider that an assessment of 949 councillors, 166 TDs, 60 Senators and 11 MEPs, put the spotlight on just a handful'
'Be all Pollyanna and consider that an assessment of 949 councillors, 166 TDs, 60 Senators and 11 MEPs, put the spotlight on just a handful'
John Downing

John Downing

"We will in our a**e have our own gentry."

Thus the late, great Breandán Ó hEithir chronicled the first "begrudger" to be recorded in the new Irish State, who spoke those fateful words to his parish priest on the morning the Anglo-Irish Treaty was signed in 1921.

The man was a blacksmith and farrier in West Cork who felt Ireland's freedom meant his own personal ruin due to the rapid exit of the horsey set, or the "gentry". His parish priest was so elated at the end of his strife over refusing absolution and communion to IRA gunmen, that he had predicted Ireland would soon have its own gentry.

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