Friday 22 September 2017

Flying too close to the sun in pursuit of glory

Following the McCracken Tribunal revelations, Haughey's former cultural adviser, the late Anthony Cronin, wrote this article in July 1997 for the Sunday Independent

Tarnished reputation: Former Taoiseach Charles Haughey was part of a drama of Shakespearean proportions Photo: Eamonn Farrell
Tarnished reputation: Former Taoiseach Charles Haughey was part of a drama of Shakespearean proportions Photo: Eamonn Farrell

The ironies abound. Dublin Castle, the very place where the tribunal sits, is ineradicably associated with the days of Charlie Haughey's power and glory. When there is an establishing shot of the Castle Yard, with the lawyers who are now the heroes of the hour doing their little walk for the cameras, when there is a cut-away shot of Government Buildings, you are inescapably reminded of the fact that he transformed the very bricks and mortar of the State's edifices, making them the symbols of our newly resurgent pride in ourselves, the pride on which the Celtic Tiger rides.

If you stroll around Temple Bar on one of these summer evenings, or look across the river at the classically modern curved glass of the Financial Services Centre, you are again reminded of the imprint he left on our very surroundings.

Si monumentum requiris, circumspice. If you seek his monument, look about you. We will find it difficult indeed to consign Charlie Haughey to oblivion, if that is what we mean to do.

Please sign in or register with Independent.ie for free access to Opinions.

Sign In

Don't Miss