Friday 2 December 2016

Sports science obsession widening competitive gap

Published 13/05/2013 | 05:00

Despite the advancement of technology, GAA players such as Cork’s Colm O’Neill continue to fall victim to the dreaded cruciate injury
Despite the advancement of technology, GAA players such as Cork’s Colm O’Neill continue to fall victim to the dreaded cruciate injury

Some months ago I wrote a small piece about an advertisement in national papers for a course called 'Adult Coach Membership', which the blurb stated would 'focus on theoretical and practical aspects of coaching and sports science intervention of Gaelic Games'.

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It was to be run by NADA, the National Athlete Development Academy, a private company, and listed a range of modules covering the various components of modern sports science. I mentioned that there seemed to be no specific reference to the actual playing skills of football, which seemed strange for such a serious sports course.

The man who directs that course, Martin Kennedy, is physical coach for the Dublin senior football team and was anxious to impress that these courses DO include practical, hands-on coaching for the skills of football, which I was glad to hear, with the emphasis on integrating skill training with the physical, promoting the overall well-being of the participants and, above all, making the sport enjoyable for them.

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