Saturday 21 October 2017

Grassroots betrayed by GAA ruling on pitch ads

PJ O'Halloran, from Kilmurray in County Clare, watches yesterdays' Ladies National Football League Division 1 final at Cusack
Park beside the sort of local advertisement hoarding that will be covered for championship matches
PJ O'Halloran, from Kilmurray in County Clare, watches yesterdays' Ladies National Football League Division 1 final at Cusack Park beside the sort of local advertisement hoarding that will be covered for championship matches
Eugene McGee

Eugene McGee

Last Wednesday a bombshell arrived in Longford when a letter from Croke Park spelled out what the GAA's recently announced 'multi-sponsorship model' really means.

When Longford play Westmeath in the opening game of the 2008 championship in Pearse Park next Sunday, any advertising sign in view of the cameras, which is practically all of them, will be covered up and only three signs will be visible. These are Ulster Bank, Vodafone and Toyota, who, presumably, will get saturation exposure all around Pearse Park.

Those wonderful GAA people who have been so excited about all the money the organisation will be getting from sponsorship and television rights from now on have a rude awakening in store this week. Or at least all of them who were innocent enough to believe that there is such a thing as a free lunch.

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