Tuesday 25 April 2017

Media's hostility is curbing its ability to hold Trump to account

US President-elect Donald Trump argues with CNN’s Jim Acosta during a recent news conference at Trump Tower, New York City. Photo: Lucas Jackson/Reuters
US President-elect Donald Trump argues with CNN’s Jim Acosta during a recent news conference at Trump Tower, New York City. Photo: Lucas Jackson/Reuters
David Quinn

David Quinn

For the first couple of years of my time in Australia, the premier of Queensland was a fellow by the name of Joh Bjelke-Petersen, the head of the conservative National Party. He was a populist to his fingertips and quite like Donald Trump in many ways.

Sir Joh, as he became known, had a relationship with the press based on mutual loathing and detestation. He would go into a press conference and say to the journalists, "time to feed the chooks" (Australian slang for chickens). They hated all he stood for and he returned the favour.

He was a PR man's nightmare. He was unpolished, rustic rather than urbane, would lose his way in the middle of a sentence, didn't have good command of detail, and went out of his way to wind up both the left, and it seemed to his advisers, swing voters.

Please sign in or register with Independent.ie for free access to Opinions.

Sign In

Don't Miss