Friday 2 December 2016

David McWilliams: Official Ireland has it all wrong - we could win big if UK opts for Brexit

Published 18/05/2016 | 02:30

Republican US presidential candidate Donald Trump and his wife Melania. The special relationship between Ireland and the US is becoming more and more significant, and a Trump presidency would not change this. Photo: Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Republican US presidential candidate Donald Trump and his wife Melania. The special relationship between Ireland and the US is becoming more and more significant, and a Trump presidency would not change this. Photo: Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

Yesterday, the American Airlines flight from Dublin to Charlotte, North Carolina, was jammed. There were five flights leaving Dublin airport for the United States between 8am and 9.30am. The very friendly American immigration official at the US immigration in Dublin told me that 3,000 people travelled from Dublin to the States on average every morning. That's a huge amount of people and, obviously, it only gauges the punters going one way. There must be a similar number coming the other way. He told me that when college term is finished, that figure will go up to 5,000 leaving Ireland for the US every morning.

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The majority of people on my flight were US tourists heading home after spending time in Ireland. Americans from all over the US are coming here and they are not just from the traditional heartlands of the Irish North East. In short, lots of Donald Trump supporters, who believe in the right to bear arms, are coming here too.

The special relationship between Ireland and the US is becoming more and more significant and this will not change if Trump wins the election, which looks less remote by the day.

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