Thursday 8 December 2016

Political stability at risk over looming 'profit tax' decision

A storm is coming that has the potential to bring down the Government and propel Ireland into the headlines, writes Dan O'Brien

Published 28/08/2016 | 02:30

WOMAN ON A MISSION: Finance Minister Michael Noonan talks to EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, who is investigating whether Apple’s tax dealings in this country breached state aid rules. Photo: AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert
WOMAN ON A MISSION: Finance Minister Michael Noonan talks to EU Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, who is investigating whether Apple’s tax dealings in this country breached state aid rules. Photo: AP Photo/Geert Vanden Wijngaert

How would the Independent All-iance and Fianna Fail react if Michael Noonan were to reject a windfall cash payment to the Exchequer of €1bn? If such a scenario sounds pie in the sky, it isn't.

  • Go To

The much-delayed outcome of an investigation by the European Commission into tech giant Apple's tax arrangements in Ireland is, by most accounts, complete. If, as seems likely, the commission finds that the Irish State allowed Apple pay less tax than it deems the company should have paid, the implications will be enormous and multiple.

The most immediate effect will be on domestic politics. The position of the last government was that no special deal had ever been done with Apple and that there was no case to answer. The previous government said that it would challenge any adverse finding against Ireland made by the commission in the European Union Court of Justice.

Please sign in or register with Independent.ie for free access to Opinions.

Sign In

Read More

Don't Miss

Editor's Choice