Tuesday 6 December 2016

Jihadis aren't winning battle - the figures just don't stack up

Last year, 25,000 people died on Europe's roads while terrorists killed 150. We should not let them rattle us

Published 27/03/2016 | 02:30

Inculated: Men study at the Jamia Rahmania Arabia madrassa in Dhaka, where Mufti Jasim Uddin Rahmani who is the the spiritual leader of the Islamic militant group, the Ansarullah Bangla Team, used to teach Photo: Alison Joyce
Inculated: Men study at the Jamia Rahmania Arabia madrassa in Dhaka, where Mufti Jasim Uddin Rahmani who is the the spiritual leader of the Islamic militant group, the Ansarullah Bangla Team, used to teach Photo: Alison Joyce

Last week's attacks in Brussels were the third instance of hyper-terrorism in Western Europe in just 14 months. Thirty one people are dead. Many more are injured. Reports say the Belgian capital remains tense as security services search for the perpetrators and others involved. Fear and anger at what has happened are understandably being felt by all right-thinking people in that city and across the continent.

  • Go To

It is in no way to disrespect the victims or downplay the enormity of what happened last week, but perspective is always needed - both in terms of the scale of the Islamist terrorism threat and the response to it.

How great is the threat? Those who are expert in jihadi groups warn of the possibility of more attacks. They are almost certainly correct. But it is by no means assured that last week's attacks, along with the two atrocities in France last year, herald the start of more frequent mass killings in western European cities.

Please sign in or register with Independent.ie for free access to Opinions.

Sign In

Read More

Don't Miss

Editor's Choice