Friday 9 December 2016

To get to truth of Bailey case may require judicial inquiry

Published 04/04/2015 | 02:30

Ian Bailey arrives at the Four Courts in Dublin where the jury in a long-running lawsuit brought by the Englishman who claims gardai conspired to frame him for the unsolved murder of a French film-maker had begun its deliberations, March 30 (Brian Lawless/PA Wire)
Ian Bailey arrives at the Four Courts in Dublin where the jury in a long-running lawsuit brought by the Englishman who claims gardai conspired to frame him for the unsolved murder of a French film-maker had begun its deliberations, March 30 (Brian Lawless/PA Wire)
Ian Bailey and Jules Thomas arrive at the Four Courts in Dublin, March 30 (Brian Lawless/PA Wire)
The family tomb in the tiny cemetary in the hamlet which overlooks the beautiful countryside in southern France where the body of Sophie Toscan Du Plantier was exhumed by French Gendarmerie (Steve Humphreys)

Out walking one day in West Cork, Sophie Toscan du Plantier discovered a dead sheep on a path. Its carcass was "an empty envelope mixed with dirt and blood", she noted in her diary, adding: "You die in the wind, in the sea, on the land here; the rottenness is spread out in daylight, perfectly naturally."

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Read now, in the knowledge of her own savage murder in the lane leading up to her house on December 23 1996, her words are chillingly prophetic.

While there was nothing natural about her brutal killing, the rottenness from that evil act has spread out and cast a shadow over the most important institutions of the State.

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