Wednesday 7 December 2016

Why is it illegal for some people to have sex in Equality Ireland?

We saw last week what a joyful experience it can be to smash discrimination, so let's liberate some more minorities

Published 31/05/2015 | 02:30

Yes voters celebrating in Dublin, as Ireland's new laws on gay marriage will be enacted by the end of July (Brian Lawless/PA Wire)
Yes voters celebrating in Dublin, as Ireland's new laws on gay marriage will be enacted by the end of July (Brian Lawless/PA Wire)

In the last few months, a lot of parents spoke publicly about the moment they found out their child was gay. And many of them admitted it was hard, certainly initially. And most of these parents gave one or both of two reasons for finding it hard initially. Nearly all of them said they worried for their child initially, because they thought life would be that bit harder for them as a gay person. This was nothing to do with their child, really, but more of a reflection on how the world can view gay people.

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The second reason that many of them gave was roughly along the lines of how the hopes and dreams they had for their children were suddenly all changed. This is not to say that there was anything wrong with the new future faced by their children, but it was not the one they expected. And they had to adjust to that.

Let me stress very clearly here that I am not drawing any parallels in what I am about to say between gay people and people with a disability, but there are certain parallels for the process that parents go through when they have a child who has a different horizontal identity than them, rather than just inheriting their identity, vertically, from the parents.

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