Friday 20 October 2017

Will 'accidental gentrification' force low-income families to move outside the M50?

There are clear risks posed by 'accidental gentrification', notably that lower-income households become priced out of the entire city within the M50. (Stock photo)
There are clear risks posed by 'accidental gentrification', notably that lower-income households become priced out of the entire city within the M50. (Stock photo)

Ronan Lyons

This latest Daft.ie House Price Report shows some signs of health in the market, amid the broader problem of a chronic lack of supply. The first sign of slightly better health is that the total number of properties actively on the market at any one time has risen compared to three months previously (June compared to March). This is only the second time in five years that this was the case.

The second measure of slightly improved conditions comes from a comparison of the asking and sale prices.

Where list prices are well above the ultimate transaction prices, this clearly points to a falling market. During 2014, however, transaction prices in Dublin were typically more than 5pc above the initial listed price, highlighting the opposite problem: a market where buyers have too little choice and push up prices.

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