Saturday 10 December 2016

Something is seriously broken in Irish education

Published 25/04/2014 | 02:30

In 2012 the annual disposable income of somebody with a third-level degree or higher was, on average, more than double that of someone who never went further than primary school.
In 2012 the annual disposable income of somebody with a third-level degree or higher was, on average, more than double that of someone who never went further than primary school.
Despite some of the highest levels of tertiary education, Ireland's 25- 34-year-olds do badly in problem-solving in technology-rich environments

IN the week that the country's teachers meet for their annual conferences, there could hardly be a better time to discuss the economic importance of education.

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By way of preface, though, let's start by stating the obvious. Education is about many things and the economic dimension – what it means for people's working lives, their earnings and how economies function – is only one aspect.

At an individual level, education enriches people's lives by broadening their horizons and allowing them the chance to fulfil their potential. At the broadest societal level, it changes the way people interact and behave, as measured by almost every indicator. Indeed, so wide-ranging are the benefits that there is even a debate about whether education make us morally better people.

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