Saturday 23 September 2017

Rowan Spelling: Internet giants pick profits over regulating porn

Recent child murders highlight need for more strict policing of online pornography, says British commentator Rowan Pelling

ONE of the most shocking aspects of the murders of Tia Sharp and April Jones is the fact it takes two child homicides for politicians and commentators to unite in calling for more stringent policing of online pornography. Stuart Hazell and Mark Bridger had both downloaded images of sexual depravity involving children, and both men viewed this material before committing murder.

I will leave criminologists to discuss what creates such killers, but there can be no doubt that child porno- graphy fuelled their warped desire – just ask the experts at the NSPCC.

So why are such gut-wrenching images so readily available? Neither Hazell nor Bridger were computer-savvy geniuses, adept at tracking down hard-to-access material. They were ill-educated, middle-aged men using popular search engines to stoke up their darkest delusions. Mark Bridger used Google and Microsoft's Bing to track down disturbing images of naked or abused children, including the search: "France: British schoolgirl raped and murdered".

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