Sunday 22 October 2017

Liz Kearney: Being married makes us happy (but we can't say that out loud)

Mr Darcy and Lizzie Bennet in a BBC production of Jane Austen’s ‘Pride and Prejudice’. Lizzie only regrets turning him down when she sees the size of his gigantic stately pile
Mr Darcy and Lizzie Bennet in a BBC production of Jane Austen’s ‘Pride and Prejudice’. Lizzie only regrets turning him down when she sees the size of his gigantic stately pile

EVER since Bridget Jones creator Helen Fielding coined the phrase 'smug married', owning up to a state of wedded bliss has been taboo. Married women, in particular, are not allowed go round telling everyone how great it is they've found Mr Right; for a start, their single friends will automatically hate them. More importantly, they run the risk of making themselves look like an idiot if Mr Right subsequently runs off with his secretary.

Since matrimonial happiness has become something of a dirty secret, we have to leave it to the statisticians to prove that it actually exists. And it absolutely does – being married makes people happier than religious beliefs, earning six-figure salaries and having children, a study by Britain's Office of National Statistics has found.

Not being in possession of religious beliefs, a six-figure salary, or children, I can't say with 100pc certainty that this is true. I can say, however, that tying the knot last year made me very happy indeed, although obviously I go round pretending to be miserable, for the reasons outlined above.

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