Monday 25 September 2017

Dearbhail McDonald: We may all be equal in eyes of God, but less so in face of our debt resolution regime

Drishane Convent in Millstreet, Co Cork, established in 1909. Inset from left high-profile bankruptcy scalps Tom McFeely, Sean Dunne and Sean Quinn
Drishane Convent in Millstreet, Co Cork, established in 1909. Inset from left high-profile bankruptcy scalps Tom McFeely, Sean Dunne and Sean Quinn

Dearbhail McDonald, Legal Affairs Editor

THEY trusted in God and they trusted in Anglo. And, like many who worshipped at the property-crazed altar of the former Anglo Irish Bank, some of the Catholic Church's faithful in Ireland got their fingers burned.

That religious orders and dioceses invested in the Irish banking sector is not new -- many were listed publicly as shareholders when the State stepped in to prevent the banking system from collapse.

But it is curious to see why at least six religious orders and dioceses emerged on a list of "politically sensitive" investors drawn up by the Anglo's former executives.

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