Saturday 10 December 2016

Darkest nights: mystery of the Dunmanway massacre

Queen's University historian Brian Walker sheds new light on four bloody nights that shamed and shocked a fledgling State

Published 01/06/2014 | 02:30

Herbert Woods, centre, whose decision to shoot sparked off the massacre
Herbert Woods, centre, whose decision to shoot sparked off the massacre
Tom Barry, who said his only fear was ‘running out of loyalist homes to destroy’
A scene from 'The Wind That Shakes The Barley' in which a Protestant landlord is shot.

The Dunmanway Killings, sometimes called the Bandon Valley Murders or the Dunmanway Massacre, is one of the most notorious events in the modern Irish revolutionary period.

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The killings occurred at Dunmanway, Co Cork, not during the War of Independence, but in late April 1922, before the Civil War. Over a few days some 10 victims were killed by the IRA. All were Protestant civilians.

In recent years the reasons for these deaths have been hotly debated by academic and non-academic historians alike.

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