Health

Sunday 21 September 2014

'We need €500k to cure our baby girl's cancer' - Clodagh's mum and dad's heartfelt appeal

Baby Clodagh is just 14 months old but has already been battling cancer for a year of her life.

Clodagh was diagnosed with stage 4-S neuroblastoma when she was just five weeks old, an aggressive form of cancer that targets the central nervous system.

The one-year-old has already received rigorous bouts of chemotherapy, radiation and immunotherapy. She has also undergone surgery to have her primary tumour removed.

But mum Tammy says Clodagh has never stopped smiling.

“She always has a smile on her face. In all she's been through in her little life she's never done it without a smile on her face," her mum Tammy told Independent.ie.

"She's a great baby, she's been so good, we've been blessed with her really.

"She loves smiling, loves playing and loves all the girlie things."

“She always has a smile on her face. In all she's been through in her little life she's never done it without a smile on her face," her mum Tammy told Independent.ie.
“She always has a smile on her face. In all she's been through in her little life she's never done it without a smile on her face," her mum Tammy told Independent.ie.
“She always has a smile on her face. In all she's been through in her little life she's never done it without a smile on her face," her mum Tammy told Independent.ie.

And this couldn't be denied. Clodagh giggled as we sat in the family’s Portlaoise home, intent on taking the cheap but shiny bracelets from my wrist.

But the facts for Baby Clodagh are stark.

- Neuroblastoma accounts for 15pc of cancer deaths in children.

- Clodagh has a 70pc of suffering a relapse.

- In Clodagh’s case, her chances of survival if she does relapse are minimal.

Her parents John and Tammy are trying to raise funds to enable Clodagh to travel to Michigan, USA to avail of the DFMO trial, a trial for a drug that prevents relapse.

The treatment has already enrolled 32 kids.

On a positive note, sixteen of the children have already been on the trial for more than a year and not a single child has relapsed.

The treatment will last for two years and will mean Clodagh and her family will travel to the USA every three months.

The treatment is estimated to cost €150,000 but John and Tammy are working towards a financial goal of €500,000 to pay for further treatment in case Clodagh relapses.

The family are grateful for the support they have received so far but are appealing for ongoing help to make sure they can give their daughter the treatment she needs.

If you wish to support the Clodagh Daly Trust, hold your own fundraising event or donate click here.

You can follow Clodagh’s journey on the Clodagh Daly Trust Facebook page

Irish Independent

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