Saturday 20 December 2014

Walking cuts risk of breast cancer, says new study

Women are encouraged to have regular mammograms
Women are encouraged to have regular mammograms

WOMEN who walk for an hour a day can cut their chance of breast cancer by 14pc, experts have said.

While it is well known that being active cuts risk of the disease, this is the first study to specifically look at the effect of walking.

The American Cancer Society study involved 73,615 postmenopausal women, of whom 4,760 were diagnosed with breast cancer during a 17-year follow-up.

The researchers found that moderate activity in the form of walking an hour a day was associated with a 14pc lower risk of the disease compared to women who were least active.

Among all women in the group, 47pc said walking was their only recreational activity and women were far more likely to take part in walking, dancing or aerobics than vigorous activities like running, swimming, and tennis.

Among those women who reported walking as their only activity, those who walked at least seven hours per week had a 14pc lower risk of breast cancer compared to those who walked three or fewer hours per week.

The study also found that women who took part in more vigorous activities for an hour a day had a 25pc lower risk of breast cancer than the least active, which echoed findings in other studies.

The results were unaffected by factors such as a woman's weight or whether she used hormone replacement therapy.

Dr Alpa Patel, senior epidemiologist at the American Cancer Society in Atlanta, Georgia, said: "Our results clearly support an association between physical activity and postmenopausal breast cancer, with more vigorous activity having a stronger effect.

"Our findings are particularly relevant, as people struggle with conflicting information about how much activity they need to stay healthy.

"Without any other recreational physical activities, walking on average of at least one hour per day was associated with a modestly lower risk of breast cancer.

"More strenuous and longer activities lowered the risk even more."

Dr Patel said the majority of women reported some daily walking and therefore promoting walking could be an effective strategy for increasing activity.

"We were pleased to find that without any other recreational activity, just walking an average of one hour per day was associated with lower risk of breast cancer in these women."

"We know that the best weapon to overcoming breast cancer is the ability to stop it occurring in the first place.

"The challenge now is how we turn these findings into action and identify other sustainable lifestyle changes that will help us prevent breast cancer."

Public Health England should conduct an audit of existing lifestyle information on preventing the disease, she added.

Press Association

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