Thursday 18 December 2014

Inability to stand on one leg predicts early death

Mark Murphy stands on one leg as he watches his second shot on the 8th hole

Simple everyday tasks such as getting out of chair and standing on one leg can be used to predict which middle aged people are at risk of an early death, a study has found.

Men aged 53 years old who could balance on one leg for more than ten seconds and stand up and sit down in a chair more than 37 times in a minute were found to be least at risk of dying early by the researchers.

Women of the same age who could stand up and sit down more than 35 times in a minute and stand on one leg for more than ten seconds were also at the lowest risk compared to those who performed less well.

Everyday tasks such as getting out of a chair without help have previously been used as an early warning sign of ill health in elderly people but the new study shows they can be used to predict health problems in people aged as young as 53.

It is hoped that eventually nurses and doctors will be able to develop a screening test to identify people who need to make lifestyle changes or medication to stave off ill health as they age.

The new study found that men who could stand up from a chair and sit down again less than 23 times in a minute were twice as likely to die in the following 13 years than those who could 37 or more.

Among women those who could stand up and sit down again less than 22 times in a minute were twice as likely to die in that time than those who could do the test 35 times or more.

Those unable to do the test at all were almost seven times more likely to die.

In the standing on one leg with eyes closed test, men and women able to hold the position for less than two seconds were three times more likely to die than those who could hold it for ten seconds or more.

Those people unable to do the test at all were around 12 times more likely to die in the following 13 years.

A third test involved squeezing a special device to measure grip strength in kilos.

The researchers combined all three tests into one score where each test had equal weight. It was found that those who performed worse overall were five times more likely to die than those who performed the best.

The study tracked 5,000 people born in 1946 throughout their lives and who had completed the tests during home visits from specially trained nurses at age 53.

Lead author Dr Rachel Cooper at the Medical Research Council said the tests were a way off from being used as a screening tool to identify people in the general population at risk of an early death but greater research on different age groups may make this possible.

It was found that an average person who did four and a quarter hours of light physical activity, such as walking, were 43 per cent less likely to develop disabilities compared with those who did three and a quarter hours.

Disability was defined as having problems with everyday activities such as walking across a room, dressing, bathing, eating, using the lavatory, and getting into bed, cooking hot meals, grocery shopping, making telephone calls, taking medications, and managing money.

The researchers said this showed that even modest increases in light activity could make the difference between living independently or not and may mean they can avoid the need for knee replacement surgery.

Telegraph.co.uk

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