Health

Thursday 2 October 2014

Fluoride in Dublin water caused enamel to come off my teeth, claims student

21 year old student, Martin Cullen, who has developed fluorosis from fluoride in the water. Picture credit; Damien Eagers / Evening Herald  13/3/2014
21 year old student, Martin Cullen, who has developed fluorosis from fluoride in the water.
A close up of Martin Cullen, teeth, the 21 year old student has developed fluorosis from fluoride in the water. Picture credit; Damien Eagers / Evening Herald  13/3/2014
A close up of Martin Cullen's, teeth
21 year old student, Martin Cullen, holds a glass of tap water,  he has developed fluorosis from fluoride in the water. Picture credit; Damien Eagers / Evening Herald  13/3/2014
Martin Cullen says he has developed fluorosis from fluoride in the water.

A social studies student Martin Cullen claims fluoride in the water has caused nasty brown marks on his teeth.

The 21-year-old from the Navan Road, Cabra  started losing the enamel from the front of his teeth, a condition known as flurosis from the age of 12.  

“I was taken to the dentist to get my teeth whitened but afterwards they were still stained," he says. 

The student was told the only solution was expensive veneers.

"I'd need them on all of my teeth so the colour would match, but I was shocked by the cost. It's out of my price bracket.

"The fluoride shouldn't be in the water. It shouldn't be happening. The dental care in this country is expensive enough."

Dentists  are one of the groups fully behind the fluoridation of our water, especially since Irish children consume some of the highest levels of sugar in Europe and have "poor brushing habits".

Sean Malone, president of the Irish Dental Association, said he has families in his practice who have put a filter on their water to eliminate fluoride and who "have increased decay rates".

In his opinion, fluoride is a "safe and effective way of reducing decay" and "the less money you have, the more you benefit".

The official policy of the Irish Dental Association (IDA), which represents more than 1,500 dentists around the country, is that fluoridation is the "most practical, cost-effective and safe public health measure to control the occurrence of tooth decay in Ireland".

While admitting that it can cause dental fluorosis -- damage to tooth enamel -- in some cases, the dentists say this is "a primarily aesthetic concern and is less difficult to treat than decay".

HN Martin Cullen 05.jpg 

It also says that the effects of the fluoridation process are continuously researched here and internationally, and subjected to rigorous review and there is "no evidence of any adverse effects".

Also in this Section

Top Stories

Most Read

Independent Gallery

Your photos

Send us your weather photos promo

Celebrity News