Exam Brief

Monday 28 July 2014

Business

TEACHER’S VIEW Never take short cuts in your revision. You must study the entire course, all 7 units. You must never leave a unit out of your revision.

Pay extra attention to Units 5, 6 and 7, as questions from these units will appear in all 3 Parts of the exam.

PAPER STRUCTURE

ORDINARY PAPER

PART1 – Short Questions (25% of the exam)

There are 15 short questions on the Ordinary level exam and students must answer 10.The question will come from all 7 units and students have 38 minutes to complete this section (roughly 4 minutes a question).

PART2 – Long Questions (75% of the exam)

There are 8 long questions divided into 2 sections. Students must attempt 4 long questions.

Section 1 contains 3 questions from Units 1, 6 and 7.

Section 2 contains 5 questions from Units 2, 3, 4, 5.

Students can do 1 question from Section 1 and therefore 3 from Section 2

OR

2 from Section 1 and therefore 2 from Section 2.

(Students roughly have 28 minutes to complete each long question)



HIGHER PAPER

PART1–Short Questions(20%oftheexam)

There are 10 short questions on the Higher level exam and students must answer 8.The question will come from all 7 units and students have 36 minutes to complete this section (again roughly 4 minutes a question).

PART2–Applied Business Question (20% of the exam)

The Applied Business Question (ABQ is compulsory).

You will read a short business Case Study and answer questions based on the story.The questions will be taken from 3 Units of the Course (There are 7 Units in the complete business course).

The Units for 2008 Sixth Year are Units 5, Unit 6 and Unit 7. There are 80 marks for the Applied Business Question, yet about 32 marks are available for simply quoting from the story to support your answer. In answering an Applied Business Question, State your Bullet point, then explain your point with references from the text and then back up each point with a quote from the text , the quote will link your answer to the story.

PART3–The Long Questions (60% of the exam)

There are 7 long questions divided into 2 sections.

Students must attempt 4 long questions. Section 1 contains 3 questions from Units1, 6 and 7.

Section 2 contains 4 questions from Units 2, 3, 4, 5.

Students can do 1 question from Section 1 and therefore 3 from Section 2.

OR

2 from Section 1 and therefore 2 from Section 2. (Students roughly have 27 minutes to complete each long question)



GENERAL ADVICE



? A good strategy for Short Questions is to study and practice answering the previous Part 1 Questions from the past years, as they sometimes repeat.

? The Short Questions may contain many questions that require the student to do some calculations, such as Ratios or Insurance. So do not forget your calculator.

? A good tactic is to try to complete at least 9 short questions, if candidates have time remaining at the end of the exam, as a contingency plan.

? Highlight Key Words in the questions in all parts of the exam.

EVALUATE–You must give your opinion, make a judgement.

ILLUSTRATE – You must explain the point and draw a graph to back it up.

DEFINE – Precise definition of the point and an example of the point.

COMPARE – Show similarities between the two points.

CONTRAST– Differences between the two points.

OUTLINE – Explain the point but leave out the in – depth detail (give extra bullet points).

ANALYSE – Give the advantages and disadvantages associated with the questions or the steps involved in the process being examined.





KEITH HANNIGAN

Business Teacher

Keith Hannigan is the Senior Business and EconomicTeacher at the Institute of Education. Keith graduated fromT.C.D. in 1996 and has been teaching Higher Level Business and Economics for ten years. He has contributed to a number of newspaper articles on the Business and Economics.

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