Thursday 27 July 2017

Volunteer call in sleep paralysis study

Sleep paralysis is a temporary inability to move or speak when falling asleep or waking up.
Sleep paralysis is a temporary inability to move or speak when falling asleep or waking up.

Imagine the frightening experience of waking up and believing someone is sitting on your chest but you cannot move.

That's a scary scenario that affects people suffering from sleep paralysis, which is a temporary inability to move or speak when falling asleep or waking up.

The School of Psychology at NUI Galway is now conducting an online study on the numbers of people affected and are looking for over 1,000 participants throughout Ireland to take part.

The study wants to look at how people's emotions and lifestyles relate to their sleep and hopes to provide insights into how and why people experience sleep difficulties like sleep paralysis.

Previous studies at NUI Galway have found that about a quarter of its students have reported experiences of sleep paralysis. People who suffer sleep paralysis can report seeing a shadow of a man or a woman, or having a sense of someone being present in their room. Sometimes the figure sits on their chest, or just simply moves towards them. Other people report their bed clothes being moved or their body being touched.

Dr Jonathan Egan of the School of Psychology says: "We are interested in how general well-being, sleep quality, stress and mood are related to episodes of sleep paralysis."

Visit surveymonkey.com/r/sleepstudynuigalway or email jonathan.egan@nuigalway.ie

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