Tuesday 6 December 2016

New museum to mark 100 years since liner Lusitania was sunk

Centenary commemorations

Published 24/04/2015 | 02:30

'The Sinking of the Lusitania' - illustration of the sinking of the American passenger liner by torpedo near south west Ireland during World War 1, 7 May 1915
'The Sinking of the Lusitania' - illustration of the sinking of the American passenger liner by torpedo near south west Ireland during World War 1, 7 May 1915

A SPECIAL Lusitania museum will open to mark the centenary of the liner's sinking during World War I.

  • Go To

The Cunard flagship was torpedoed by the German submarine U-20 off the Cork coast on May 7, 1915 with the loss of 1,198 lives.

The Old Head Signal Tower outside Kinsale in Co Cork, which overlooks the waters where the liner was attacked, has been restored and will be opened by Marine Minister Simon Coveney on May 7 as a dedicated Lusitania museum.

The museum opening and a special re-enactment of the RMS Lusitania rescue in Courtmacsherry are key events to mark the centenary of the tragedy.

The Courtmacsherry lifeboat was rowed several miles out to the site of the sinking - and, working with other vessels, managed to save 764 people.

Lusitania centenary commemorations will start in Courtmacsherry over the May bank holiday weekend. Many of those taking part are direct descendants of those who tried to save passengers 100 years ago.

Brothers Brian and Micheál O'Donovan will share the coxswain duties for the centenary rowing event. The O'Donovans are direct descendants of the 1915 coxswain, Tim Keohane, who was father of the famous Arctic explorer Patrick Keohane.

Read more:

Irish Independent

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Life