Tuesday 25 October 2016

More travel misery for Irish passengers as further flights cancelled due to French air traffic strike

Published 08/04/2015 | 20:09

Terminal 2, Dublin Airport
Terminal 2, Dublin Airport

Irish passengers heading to and from France face further travel misery with Ryanair cancelling an additional 250 flights tomorrow.

  • Go To

And as the country’s air traffic controllers launch a series of strikes in the coming weeks, the airline warned “further cancellations and delays are likely.”

The carrier was forced to cancel 250 flights across various European routes today, causing major disruption for thousands of its passengers.

Seventeen flights in and out of Shannon and Dublin airports were cancelled.

The carrier confirmed this evening a further 250 scheduled flights tomorrow have been scrapped, as a result of the 48-hour walkout. 

And the problems for intending passengers looks set to continue, with controllers due to stage another stoppage next week.

Following planned industrial action on April 16-18, workers have also threatened to down tools on April 29 to May 2.

Ryanair has urged customers to check the status of their flight before leaving for the airport.

A spokeswoman told Independent.ie passengers are being “held to ransom” by the workers’ actions.

She said all discommoded customers have been contacted and advised of their options.

The carrier repeated its call for the French government and the EU to “act now” to prevent further cancellations and delays.

It also apologised to all customers affected by this “unwarranted strike action.

A list of cancellations can be found of the airline’s website.

Meanwhile, Aer Lingus has been forced to cancel two flights: EI 526 Dublin to Paris and EI 527 Paris to Dublin.

All other Aer Lingus flights between Ireland and France are planned to operate.

“Customers are advised to check the status of their flight on aerlingus.com prior to departing for the airport,” a statement from the airline said.

The airline also apologised for the disruption caused “due to matters beyond our control.”

The main air traffic controllers’ union, the SNCTA, are calling for talks over working practices and retirement age, currently set at 59.

The SNCTA has already threatened strike earlier but scrapped the proposed industrial action in the wake of the Germanwings crash that killed 150 people.

Online Editors

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Life