Friday 26 May 2017

Rock Star: 12 amazing photos that bring the Burren to life

This is the Burren

Full moon rising over Abbey Hill.
taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Full moon rising over Abbey Hill. taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Feral goats on Mullaghmore. taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Waterfall at Aillwee Cave. One of the main features of limestone is its solubility in water. The strange shape of the Burren landscape is only one consequence of this feature; the real effect goes much deeper. Under the limestone pavements andhills exists another landscape, equally beautiful but even stranger than the one above: caves. taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Traditional butter making in the Burren, County Clare. taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Summer morning, Gleninagh. taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Doolin coast, the Burren, County Clare. taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Winter solstice day, Burren National Park. taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Volunteers rebuilding a drystone wall in the Burren in the rain. taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Mountain Avens, The Burren, County Clare, Ireland taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Midnight at Doolin Pier. The area around Doolin Pier offers many interesting geological features. Just southeast of the pier is where the limestone of the Burren and the dark shale of the Cliffs of Moher meet, at the mouth of the River Aille. The coastline north of the pier is a good example of coastal erosion: wavesculpted rock, storm beaches, cave passages and blowholes have all been created by the constant battering of Atlantic waves.taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Spring Gentian, The Burren, County Clare, Ireland taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Wildflowers at Ballyvaughan Bay. taken from This is the Burren by Carsten Krieger, published by The Collins Press, 2015
Pól Ó Conghaile

Pól Ó Conghaile

A new book of photography casts a fresh light on one of Ireland's most enigmatic and magical landscapes.

'This is the Burren', a dramatic collection of images by Clare-based photographer, Carsten Krieger, was published by Collins Press this week.

The book boasts 176 photos, ranging from the Burren's shattered limestone landscape to its exotic wildflowers, elusive wildlife and the people that call it home.

"The book is a tribute to how man and nature are deeply entwined in the Burren and have shaped each other over the millennia," said Cllr. James Breen, Cathaoirleach of Clare County Council.

It was published with the support of the Burren and Cliffs of Moher Global Geopark, which was last month awarded Unesco Global Geopark status.

Krieger, who was born in Germany, first visited the Burren after learning it was an inspiration for J.R.R. Tolkien’s Middle Earth. More visits followed before he and his wife finally decided to move to the County Clare landscape.

The book took four years to complete, but the photographer says he could easily have spent several more years exploring the rugged national park.

"Every trip brings something new and unexpected," he says.

'This is the Burren' is available in all good bookstores and online at collinspress.com. For more on Carsten Krieger, visit carstenkrieger.co.uk.

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