Saturday 3 December 2016

More taste for a scrap than the French football team

Eddie Cunningham Motoring Editor

Published 23/06/2010 | 05:00

THE French football team may not have had the stomach for a scrap but one of their carmakers tops the scrappage league here.

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Renault is way out in front when it comes to the number of cars it has sold to replace old bangers under the Government's incentive, according to new figures released by the Society of the Irish Motor Industry (SIMI).

They show that up to the end of May there were 7,368 reclaims made under the scrappage scheme.

Nearly one in five (18pc) of these involved the purchase of a new Renault, with 15pc scrapped against a Ford and 10pc against Skoda and Volkswagen.

The numbers are starting to tail off a bit now, but it is interesting to note that the scheme peaked in March (30pc of purchases) and not in January.

Nearly a quarter of all deals were done in the Dublin area while 42 were done in Leitrim.

Fewer buyers (46pc) opted for the lowest-emission new cars (14pc VRT, €104 road tax). They were edged out by the 54pc who bought Category B motors (16pc, €156 road tax).

Don't get the idea these were all small cars. Many, many substantial vehicles come in under the Category B parameters, though exactly how many were involved in scrappage transactions is not clear.

What is clear is that the scheme has breathed some oxygen into a smothering market, kept jobs alive and in some cases led to people being taken on in garages where business was going well.

There is no doubt that some marques here really went for it, bells and whistles, to gain not just sales but market share.

As of now Renault is king of the scrappers. And fair dues to them.

Test

A big test awaits all carmakers next year when the incentive may not be there to provide such a platform.

But that's another test ahead, and emboldened by this year's lift no doubt they'll give it a lash. Which is more than the French did yesterday as they trooped home from the World Cup with no sign of a taste for any sort of scrap.

Irish Independent

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