Tuesday 28 February 2017

One third are planning to change car this year - but watch out for the toll 'sting'

The number of people 'thinking' about buying a car in 2016 will come as good news to dealers
The number of people 'thinking' about buying a car in 2016 will come as good news to dealers

ONE-THIRD of Irish motorists are thinking about buying a new or newer vehicle in the second half of the year. Of those, more than half (54pc) plan on buying a 162-reg.

The figures come courtesy of easytrip - but there is a warning attached. They are alerting customers who are switching vehicles to make sure to update their toll bills. Otherwise they could be handing the new owners of their old cars a toll-free ride.

That can happen if you leave your toll tag, for example, in the vehicle you've sold or traded in. You should also update your account details as soon as the change of ownership has been processed.

The easytrip survey found that: * Nearly half (46pc) of those thinking of buying new will change to a car of similar size to their current one;

* 31pc plan on buying a larger model while 8pc will look to downsize car and engine, and

* One-in-seven (14pc) are looking at buying a second family car.

But make sure you are not paying someone else's tolls, should you leave your tag in your old vehicle, and forget to update your toll account. Easytrip say: "The new owner could continue to use your tag at most barrier toll plazas, racking up a bill connected to your account."

If you have transferred your existing tag to a new car but forget to update account details, you risk getting a toll bill (at the higher rate) and penalty charge if you've travelled through the M50 toll plaza. That's because your new car registration is not connected to your toll tag account.

The number of people 'thinking' about buying a car in 2016 will come as good news to dealers hoping for a major increase in business from July 1 when the 162-reg period begins. Experts forecast up to 155,000 new cars will be registered for 2016 though some order books have been slower than last year in filling up.

Irish Independent

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