Sunday 25 September 2016

Looking forward to that extra hour in bed? Seven things you didn't know about Daylight Saving Time

Published 23/10/2015 | 12:58

Annabelle Edwards (5) from Swords & Abbie Kilbane (7) from Celbridge get ready to turn the clocks back this weekend
Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Annabelle Edwards (5) from Swords & Abbie Kilbane (7) from Celbridge get ready to turn the clocks back this weekend Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

We're on the countdown to this side of the year's Daylight Saving, also known as the 'weekend the clocks go back', or 'that extra hour in bed'.

This is up for debate, but the origin of daylight saving time is commonly attributed to Benjamin Franklin, who wrote an essay in 1784 about how changing time could save energy, according to CNN.

  • Go To

Don't forget to turn the clocks back on Sunday, October 25 at 2am.

For now, here are seven things you didn't know about the 'spring forward, fall back' phenomenon.

1. It was the great-great-grandfather of Coldplay rocker Chris Martin - William Lillet - that first introduced the concept of 'daylight saving' in a written pamplet in 1907.

2. William Lillet published a paper called 'The Waste of Daylight' in a bid to get people out of bed earlier by changing the nation’s clocks -  but died in 1915, a year before his clock-changing plan was adopted by Germany and the UK.

3. It was not the first time the concept of 'daylight savings' had been suggested - the origin of the idea is up for debate. Modern Daylight Saving Time was first proposed by the New Zealand entomologist George Vernon Hudson, but Benjamin Franklin also wrote an essay in 1784 on how changing time could save energy.

4. The 'daylight savings' scheme has always proved controversial - according to a survey by Irish lighting company Solus, a total of 65pc of Irish people would rather if the clocks did not change this Sunday.

5. There are currently about 70 countries that participate in Daylight Saving Time, though not necessarily on the same schedule as Ireland.

6. In Ireland, the maximum 17 hours of sunlight - on the longest day in June (the summer solstice) - dwindles to just seven hours and 30 minutes six months later in December (the winter solstice).

7. The majority of Irish people (54pc) plan to spend their extra hour in bed, while 14pc said they'll use the extra time 'to embrace the day'.

Online Editors

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Life